Letizia Battaglia, who shot life and death in Palermo, died.

OBIT - Letizia Battaglia gestures during a press conference in March 2016 in Palermo, Italy. Letizia Battaglia, an Italian photographer documenting the arrest of a mafia boss and the bodies of his victims.  Died in Palermo, her hometown of Sicily, aged 87. (Guglielmo Mangiapane/LaPresse via AP)

OBIT – Letizia Battaglia gestures during a press conference in March 2016 in Palermo, Italy. Letizia Battaglia, an Italian photographer documenting the arrest of a mafia boss and the bodies of his victims. Died in Palermo, her hometown of Sicily, aged 87. (Guglielmo Mangiapane/LaPresse via AP)

AP

Letizia Battaglia, an Italian photographer who recorded the arrest of a mafia boss and the bodies of his victims. Died in Palermo, her hometown of Sicily. She was 87 years old.

Among the officials who announced her death was Palermo Mayor Leo Luca Orlando, who stood guard by her coffin as she woke up in the town hall on Thursday. A day after her death No cause of death was cited, but Battaglia had been in weak health for some time.

Most of her work is mostly black and white. explores the daily lives of those who live in the impoverished neighborhoods of Palermo. Where Cosa Nostra’s chiefs dominate, Battaglia photographs ordinary Sicilians in moments of sorrow and joy.

Among the photographs she noted is the corpse of the Sicilian governor assassinated by his brother, who 35 years later will be elected president of Italy.

Battaglia said that on January 6, 1980, she ran to the scene where a man in his car was shot dead. and started taking that photo before she knew who the victim was.

She soon learns that the deceased was Governor Pirzanti Mattarella, and that the man who hurriedly grabbed his body as he removed it from the car was Sergio. his brother, who 35 years later will become the president of Italy.

Frequently asked about that photograph, Battaglia would say that while she photographed the scene of the death for her, it was a moment of hope as Sergio Mattarella would have the determination and courage to pursue a career in politics. and later held the highest position of Italy

Besides their deaths in the streets of Palermo, Battaglia photographed their lives. The cover of her photographic book “Palermo amore amaro” (Palermo’s Bitter Love) is a slender, almost teenage girl. Holding a soccer ball in one hand and giving the camera a heavy look as she leans against graffiti—breaks through a door in 1982 in Kalsa, a tough Palermo neighborhood.

The other picture is of a girl. washing dishes in a poor house There is a toilet bowl in the kitchen. Other photos show couples cuddling at the beach or kissing in the countryside.

Other Battaglia photographs capture scenes familiar to the people of Palermo, especially in the 1980s when Mafia turf wars bled the city. One photograph from 1983 shows three bodies. A corpse collapsed onto a ceramic floor. another figure on the sofa and another corpse was in an armchair. It was the murder of three people in an apartment.

There is a photograph of an aging mother. holding a photo of her son A radio reporter who dared to condemn the local gangsters by air name and who was killed, was tied to a railroad track and smashed with a stick. Dynamite stuffed into his clothes.

“Letizia Battaglia with photographs captures the spirit of Palermo,” said Senator Pietro Grasso, who was Italy’s leading anti-mafia prosecutor. Write it on Facebook to express condolences. “The women and girls she photographed throughout her life. and crime photos of the mafia They usually arrive at the scene in front of the police.”

She captured “the victim’s sorrow from the arrogance of the clan leader. blood on the street The protagonist in the fight against Cosa Nostra,” Grasso said.

Born in Palermo on March 5, 1935, she married at 16 and had three daughters. In her 30s, she started photography. by working in Milan But he was hired by a Sicilian newspaper to work in Palermo. Battaglia’s work is also published by the major Italian weekly magazines L’Espresso and Panorama.

Battaglia also spent many years in politics. He served as Palermo’s Commissioner for Culture during previous administrations. one of orlando and is represented in Sicily’s regional legislature.

Battaglia, with the Italian surname “Battle”, is volcanic in nature. Have a forever young attitude working through the last months of deteriorating health Her last assignment was the cover of seven magazines, Corriere della Sera’s daily magazine, pictured here, 19-year-old Italian singer-songwriter Ariete.

In an interview for the book “Palermo amore amaro,” the interviewer remarked at the end that the two people in the conversation had never mentioned the Mafia.

“Well, that’s fine,” Battaglia replied. “Why are you always talking about them? Let’s go over them.”

Her family said her body would be cremated and dispersed in the sea near Palermo at her request.

Leave a Comment